To Plot or Not?

I’ve mentioned before that my husband and I enjoy camping. We love to get away from the hustle and bustle of the everyday world, explore the great outdoors, and then snuggle by a campfire under a blanket of stars. It’s wonderful. However, there are some downsides to camping, and perhaps the biggest is that it requires more planning — and packing — than just staying at a hotel.

When it comes to packing, my husband and I couldn’t be more different. He’s a list maker. If it’s on the list, it goes. If it’s not, it doesn’t. This is true of groceries, too. It doesn’t matter if we’ve had a ten minute discussion about needing shredded cheddar cheese — if it’s not on the list, he’ll come home without it.

As for me? Sometimes I make lists, but when I do, it’s scribbled on a post-it or a napkin or the back of an envelope. It immediately gets lost (or stolen by faeries), long before I need to look at it again. If I do manage to keep up with it, I’m never able to stick to it. Something always gets added, or forgotten, or both.

With writing, I’m much the same way. I like to have a list — an outline — but it often gets lost, ignored, or changed.

Still, I have to admit that the writing process goes more smoothly when I have an outline. That’s not true of everyone. Some writers are 100% “pantsers” (they write by the seat of their pants, planning nothing in advance). To them, an outline is stifling and kills their creativity. Other writers create fifty-page outlines that plot out the book’s journey in its entirety, with routes from A to B to C all planned out. For them, writer’s block comes when they don’t know where the story is going. Then there are writers like me, who work better with an outline, but prefer it to be far less detailed. For me, the outline is like a road map with the destinations decided but the routes left to chance. Sometimes the destinations even change along the way.

There’s no wrong way or right way — as long as the book gets written.

“Some beautiful paths can’t be discovered without getting lost.” – Erol Ozan

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